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*Animal Protection
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1420 Brookside Blvd
Grants Pass, OR 97526
Phone: 541-474-5458
Fax: (541) 956-5853
Contact: Diane Hoover
Email: 
Hours: Tuesday-Friday 10:00am -4:00pm Saturday 10:00am - 3:00pm; Closed Sunday & Monday
Animal Protection

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Description

 

Mission Statement:

To promote a humane, safe and healthy environment for our animals and our community

 

Objectives

 

Program Purpose:

  • Maintain a clean and disease free environment for sheltered animals.
  • Enforce Animal Regulation and Protection State laws, Local Ordinances and Mandates.
  • Provide professional and compassionate animal services through shelter, adoption, educational programs, population control and health care services while remaining fiscally responsible.
  • Create a sense of community ownership.·     

 

VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO HELP PLAY AND WALK WITH THE ANIMALS!!! PLEASE CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION. 541-474-5458.

To review animal control laws in the State of Oregon, click on the attached link:

http://www.animallaw.info/statutes/stusorst433_340_609_994.htm



Adopt, Love & License Your Dog

 

It could save lives!

*A license says that your dog is a pet                              

*A license insures a five day stay at the shelter if your dog is lost and brought to the shelter

Your pet license fees pay for these animal services:

*Reunite pets with their owners

* Investigate complaints about animal abuse

* Investigate complaints & bite incidents

 

How Do I License My Dog?

IT’S EASY!  Bring proof  of current rabies vaccination  to the Public Health Department at  715 NW Dimmick Street or the Animal Shelter at 1420 Brookside in Merlin to license your dog today!

Altered Dogs  $20

Unaltered Dogs  $40

Hours of Operation:  Tues. - Fri. 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.  Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

 

Did you know that the potential fine for an unlicensed dog is $260?  (EEK!)

License your loved ones TODAY!!!


 

 

APRIL IS NATIONAL HEARTWORM AWARENESS MONTH
 

What Is Heartworm?
A heartworm is a parasitic worm (Dirofilaria immitis) that lives in the heart and pulmonary arteries of an infected animal. The microfilariae travel through the bloodstream—harming arteries and vital organs as they go—ultimately completing their journey to the vessels of the lung and the heart chamber about six months after the initial infection. Heartworm infection can cause potentially serious damage to these arteries, eventually leading to heart failure and damaging other organs such as the liver and kidneys. In extreme cases, a dog can be infected with several hundred heartworms, effecting the dog’s health and quality of life, long after the parasites are gone. Dogs of any age and breed are susceptible to infection.
What Causes Heartworm?
This severe and sometimes fatal disease is transmitted to your pet by the bite of a mosquito infected by the heartworm. When the mosquito then bites another dog, cat, or susceptible animal, it then passes the larvae into the animal's blood stream through the bite wound, resulting in heartworm infection. Adult female heartworms produce microfilariae (juvenile heartworms) and release them into circulation. These microfilariae act as a reservoir and can then be picked up by mosquitoes that bite an infected animal. Heartworms enter an animal’s bloodstream as tiny, invisible larvae, but can reach lengths of more than twelve inches at maturity.
What Are the General Symptoms of Heartworm?
Clinical signs depends on the number of heartworms, how long the dog has been infected with heartworms, the age of the dog, and the activity of the dog. Symptoms of heartworm infestation can include labored breathing, coughing, vomiting, weight loss and listlessness, and fatigue after only moderate exercise. However, some dogs exhibit no symptoms at all until late stages of infection.
How Is Heartworm Diagnosed?
Heartworm disease is diagnosed by examination, radiographs or ultrasound, and a veterinarian-administered blood test. All dogs should be routinely screened with a blood test for heartworm either annually in spring, at the start of mosquito season, or before being placed on a new prescription for a heartworm preventive.
How Can Heartworm Be Prevented?
Prevention is by far the best option. There are a variety of options for the prevention of heartworm infection, including an injectable administered by your veterinarian that provides protection for six months, daily and monthly tablets and chewables. All of these methods are extremely effective, and when administered properly on a timely schedule, heartworm infection can be completely prevented.
How Is Heartworm Treated?
Your veterinarian will determine the most appropriate protocol for your dog. As with any treatment, there are risks. The largest risk posed is the development of pulmonary thromboembolism. This is caused by dead heartworm obstructing the pulmonary arteries and veins. Clinical signs of pulmonary thromboembolism include coughing, coughing up blood, exercise intolerance, and sudden death. For this reason, if your dog is being treated for heartworm disease, it is imperative that all dogs are not exercised during treatment. Any dog being treated for heartworm disease should be tested 4-6 months post treatment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Links
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Facebook for Josephine County Animal Shelter
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Facebook page for Shelter Friends
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License/Adoption/Complaint Forms/Record Request
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OREGON AIDS/STD Hotline
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Oregon Health Authority's Maternal Mental Health
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Shelter Friends Website
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Volunteer Application
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